Schlegel Centre for Learning, Research & Innovation in Long Term Care

The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care has created 3 Centres of Excellence for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long Term Care. These Centres are located within the Schlegel, Baycrest and Bruyère organizations.

As a Program of the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging, the Schlegel Centre for Learning, Research and Innovation (CLRI) in Long Term Care leverages on and benefits from a large infrastructure that has been intentionally designed over the last 15+ years. The RIA is a charitable foundation that partners with the University of Waterloo, Conestoga College and Schlegel Villages to develop and implement research and training programs that enhance the care and quality of life of older adults.

There is a need for innovation in the long-term care sector and the Schlegel CLRI aims to catalyze system transformation through research-informed practice change and innovation in workforce preparedness.

To learn more about Schlegel CLRI activities, visit the links below:

 

Research Institute for Aging
Supported with funding from the Government of Ontario.

The Need for Innovation

Changing demographics are putting increasing pressure on health care costs and funding for the health care system to the point that it will not be sustainable for the future. In the face of these demographics and an already resource-limited system, the only solution is innovation.

“Just as our education system responded decades ago to the baby boom, today’s health care system must now prepare for the demographic shift that will double the number of seniors living in Ontario over the next 20 years” (Ontario’s Action Plan for Health Care, 2012)

“It is increasingly clear that Ontario’s capacity to provide affordable, accessible and high quality care in settings preferred by seniors, will not meet future needs without significant innovation and transformation” (Conference Board of Canada, 2011)

Multiple forces create an urgency for innovation:

  • There has already been a marked increase in the number of long-term care residents with multiple diagnoses or co-morbidities, and chronic diseases will be more prevalent in future years.
  • A “rising tide” of dementia is impairing the ability of many Ontarians to live independently.
  • Baby boomers are likely to exhibit stronger preferences for independent living arrangements, greater autonomy, and choice in services than previous generations.
  • The ethnic and linguistic profile of seniors is becoming more diverse.
  • By 2017, for the first time, Ontario will be home to more people over 65 than children under 15 (Ontario Action Plan for Seniors, 2013).

The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care has met this need for innovation by creating 3 Centres of Excellence for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long Term Care. These Centres are located within the Schlegel, Baycrest and Bruyère organizations. The goal of the Ministry awards is to help Ontario prepare wisely for an aging population.

The SCLCI has been mentioned in the OANHSS Action Update newsletters, details here.