Quality Care in Long-Term Care Webinar Series

Free webinar series hosted by the Centre for Learning, Research, and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA):  

  •  September 20|1:30pm-2:30pm EST  The Importance of Resident Engagement  –  Register

These free webinars (see descriptions below) are open to Ontario long-term care (LTC) home providers, residents, family members, volunteers, and students who want to gain new knowledge and strategies to improve the quality of care and life in LTC.

For more information about these webinars, please contact Kate Ducak.


Upcoming  Webinars

September 20, 2018 |1:30pm-2:30pm EST

The Importance of Resident EngagementJaimie Killingbeck portrait 1Jennifer Hartwick portrait 5

Jennifer Hartwick, MSc. (Kin), Director of Business Process Development, Schlegel Villages

Jaimie Killingbeck, R.Kin, Director of Quality and Innovation, Schlegel Villages

This webinar is being offered in collaboration with the Seniors Quality Leap Initiative (SQLI) and will explore some of the strategies that Schlegel Villages have used to engage residents in enhancing Village Life. SQLI is comprised of 15 leading long-term care (LTC) and post-acute providers across North America and is supported by 10 strategic partners. As an active community of practice, SQLI is engaged in an innovative effort to improve clinical quality and safety related to the quality of life of seniors, by sharing performance data and the results of specific quality improvement initiatives.

The objectives of the webinar are to share:
1) Ways residents are socially engaged
2) How to measure resident engagement and satisfaction through a self-reported survey
3) How to involve residents in creating change

Register Today!


Archived Webinars

May 29, 2018  |  10:00AM – 11:00AM EST

CHOICE+ Program: New Tools and Online Education to Enhance the Mealtime Experience in Long-Term Care Keller_Headshot

Heather Keller, PhD, RD, FDC, Schlegel Research Chair in Nutrition & Aging; Professor, Kinesiology, University of Waterloo; Research Scientist, Agri-food for Healthy Aging, Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging 

CHOICE+ is an innovative program that aims to improve the mealtime experience for residents in long-term care and retirement living. The program focuses on developing relationship-centred practices and enhancing the dining environment to make it more welcoming, comfortable, and enjoyable. This webinar will describe the six principles of CHOICE+ and introduce tools and resources that teams can start using to make change. Two user-friendly tools will be shared along with the recently launched CHOICE+ online education modules. The webinar will highlight how these tools can be used to improve mealtimes in your home.

Download the slides from this webinar.
Click here to view the webinar recording.

 

APRIL 24, 2018  |  9:30AM – 10:30AM EST

The Inconvenient Tooth: Exploring challenges and best practices in the management of daily mouth care for older adults in long-term careHeadshot of Mary McNally

Mary McNally, MSc, DDS, MA, Faculties of Dentistry and Medicine, Dalhousie University

Given advances in dental care over the last half century, Canadians are no longer aging with the inevitable loss of their teeth. While this is a welcome trend, it also results in more and more older adults in residential care who require assistance with daily mouth care.  On the surface, brushing and flossing seem to be simple mundane tasks.  But when providing this care for others, it requires skill, the right resources and the commitment to ensure it is done well.  In this webinar we will review the basics of oral disease and its impact on general health and wellness.  We will also explore ways to manage daily mouth care for those living in residential care with an overview of the Brushing Up on Mouth Care suite of online, open access resources that were developed in partnership with front-line care staff from long-term care.

Download the slides from this webinar.

Click here to view the webinar recording.

 

MARCH 28, 2018  |  3:00PM – 4:00PM EST

Improving Food Quality in Long-Term Care: Best practices and new initiativesKeller_Headshot_Updated

Heather Keller, PhD, RD, FDC, Schlegel Research Chair in Nutrition & Aging; Professor, Kinesiology, University of Waterloo; Research Scientist, Agri-food for Healthy Aging, Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging 

This webinar will review results from the Making the Most of Mealtimes study, and how food plays a role in the nutritional well-being of residents. Focus will be on food provided in LTC, what factors are associated with nutrient density, as well as best practices for promoting nutrient density of menus. Nutrition in Disguise will be discussed as a new initiative to improve nutrient density of commonly consumed foods in LTC.

Download the slides from this webinar.

Click here to view the webinar recording.


FEBRUARY 27, 2018  |  3:00PM – 4:00PM EST

George Heckman

Chronic Disease Management in Long-Term Care Homes

Dr. George Heckman, MD, MMATH, MSc, Schlegel Research Chair in Geriatric Medicine, Associate Professor, Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo;
Staff, Hamilton Health Services Corporation, Hamilton and St. Joseph’s Health Care

Medical advances during the previous decades have allowed persons with chronic disease to live longer. However, this has led to greater numbers of older adults with multiple chronic conditions, compounded by the emergence of concurrent geriatric syndromes such as dementia and frailty. Our health care system was not designed with such persons in mind. What are their needs? How do we change health care to meet these needs, and thus improve their outcomes?

Download the slides from this webinar.

Click here to view the webinar recording.

 

FEBRUARY 22, 2018  |  10:00AM – 11:00AM EST

Maintaining and Improving Mobility in Ontario Long-Term Care Homes

CaitlinMcArthurCaitlin McArthur, PhD MScPT, Registered Physical Therapist and Post-Doctoral Fellow, Geriatric Education and Research in Aging Science Centre (GERAS), McMaster University

Maintaining and improving mobility is often a goal for residents and their family members, and is important to prevent functional decline and improve quality of life. This webinar will focus on evidence-based strategies to maintain and improve mobility for residents in LTC homes. The objectives of the webinar are to: 1) discuss current evidence for strategies to maintain and improve resident mobility; 2) present practical solutions for putting evidence about mobility into practice in LTC homes; and 3) examine ways to modify suggestions for different physical and cognitive abilities.

Download the slides from this webinar.

Click here to view the webinar recording.

 

JANUARY 24, 2018  |  3:00PM – 4:00PM EST

Enhancing Team Relationships: A prerequisite to the provision of person-centred care in residential care homes

SiennaCasparSienna Caspar, PhD, MA, Assistant Professor, University of Lethbridge, Faculty of Health Sciences, Therapeutic Recreation program

An unintended consequence of the advent of the computerized medical record is a decrease in care team members coming together to connect and collaborate by actually talking with one another. This evidenced based presentation will focus on the difference between documentation and communication. We will discuss the importance of communication as an essential ingredient to building relationships and trust between care team members. Following this, we learn why enhancing team relationships is an essential prerequisite to the provision of person-centred care. Evidence for this discussion is derived from both quantitative and qualitative studies conducted across multiple LTC settings.

Download the slides from this webinar.

Click here to view the webinar recording.


Speaker Bios

 

Sienna Caspar, PhD, MA

Assistant Professor, University of Lethbridge, Faculty of Health Sciences, Therapeutic Recreation program

Sienna CasparSienna received a B.Sc. in Therapeutic Recreation from the University of South Alabama in 1990. She has worked in long-term care facilities in both Canada and the United States for over 20 years as both a certified therapeutic recreation specialist (CTRS) and a consultant. She is the author of the MARRCC (Measurable Assessment in Recreation for Resident-Centred Care). From 2003 to 2007 she was a national trainer for the American Therapeutic Recreation Association’s Dementia Practice Guideline for the non-pharmacological treatment of disturbing behaviours. In 2008, she received a MA in Gerontology from Simon Fraser University.  Her thesis explored the relationship between care staff empowerment and the ability to provide person-centred care in long-term care settings.  She continued to study this important topic at the University of British Columbia, where she completed her PhD in the Interdisciplinary Studies Graduate Program. As a postdoctoral fellow in a cross appointment at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute/University Health Network and the University of Victoria, she conducted an intervention study aimed at improving leadership and collaborative decision making in long-term care settings. Currently, she is an assistant professor at the University of Lethbridge in the Faculty of Health Sciences—Therapeutic Recreation program.

 

Caitlin McArthur, PhD MScPT

Registered Physical Therapist and Post-Doctoral Fellow, Geriatric Education and Research in Aging Science Centre (GERAS), McMaster University

CaitlinMcArthur

Caitlin is a registered physical therapist and post doctoral fellow at the Geriatric Education and Research in Aging Science Centre (GERAS) at McMaster University. She recently completed her PhD in the Kinesiology department at the University of Waterloo with a specialization in aging, health, and well-being. Caitlin’s research focuses on improving rehabilitation across the continuum of care, including long-term care and home care. She also has expertise in bone health, exercise, and physical activity. Caitlin is an instructor of Bone Fit™, a continuing education course for rehabilitation professionals working with people with osteoporosis. Caitlin is the recipient of several awards including the Ontario Graduate Scholarship and the Canadian Physiotherapy Association’s Silver Quill Award. Her current work is funded by the McMaster Institute for Research on Aging.

 

Dr. George Heckman, MD, MMATH, MSc

Schlegel Research Chair in Geriatric Medicine, Associate Professor, Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo; Staff, Hamilton Health Services Corporation, Hamilton and St. Joseph’s Health Care

DGeorge Heckmanr. George Heckman graduated in 1991 Doctor of Medicine at University of Toronto, Ontario Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, with specialist certification in Internal Medicine (1999) and Geriatric Medicine Master of Science (Health Research Methodology, McMaster University in 2006). He holds a Schlegel Research Chair in Geriatric Medicine and is presently an Associate Professor with the department of Public Health and Health Systems at the University of Waterloo as well as an Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at McMaster University. Research interests include management of heart failure in long term care and other frail seniors, primary care management of dementia, home care safety and vascular aging.

 

Heather Keller, PhD, RD, FDC

Schlegel Research Chair in Nutrition & Aging; Professor, Kinesiology, University of Waterloo; Research Scientist, Agri-food for Healthy Aging, Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging 

Keller_Headshot_UpdatedHeather Keller RD PhD is the Schlegel Research Chair in Nutrition & Aging at the University of Waterloo. She conducts research focused on improving the food intake and nutritional health of older adults in hospital, community and long-term care residences. A special focus is persons living with dementia and their care partners and how food and mealtimes can be central to their quality of life.

 

 

Mary McNally, MSc, DDS, MA

Professor, Faculties of Dentistry and Medicine, Dalhousie University

Headshot of Mary McNallyMary is a professor and researcher in the Faculties of Dentistry (Clinical Sciences) and Medicine (Bioethics) at Dalhousie University.  The first decade of her dental career was spent as a general dentist in rural Nova Scotia where she witnessed large gaps in care for marginalized populations, particularly for older adults who are dependent on others for care. These experiences have shaped her academic career.  A hallmark of her research program is building interdisciplinary teams that involve community partners and knowledge-users to inform research priorities, questions and processes. Provincial and national funding has supported her research in personal mouth care of frail older adults, applied ethics, and more recently to support community-based research to address oral health challenges facing Inuit and First Nations people in Atlantic Canada.

Jennifer Hartwick, MSc. (Kin)

Director of Business Process Development, Schlegel Villages

Jennifer Hartwick portrait 5

Jennifer Hartwick has a passion for working with older adults and has over 16 years of both Retirement and LTC experience. She has both a Bachelors and Masters of Science degree in Kinesiology from the University of Waterloo.  Jennifer has held several positions within Schlegel Villages which currently operates 7 continuum of care communities and 12 LTC Homes in Ontario.  Her roles have allowed her to gain experience with a wide variety of operational issues. As the Director of Business Process Development she is responsible for ensuring a variety of projects within operations are supported from conception to implementation. This has included supporting the design, implementation and early monitoring of new projects such as the Quality of Life Satisfaction survey and quality improvement protocols and tracking across the organization. When Jennifer is not working she is kept busy by her family including her two young children.

Jaimie Killingbeck, R.Kin

Director of Quality and Innovation, Schlegel Villages

Jaimie Killingbeck portrait 1
Jaimie Killingbeck is the Director of Quality and Innovation with Schlegel Villages.  She began her journey with the organization in 2003 as a Kinesiologist at The Village of Riverside Glen, and in 2011 joined the Schlegel Villages Support Office as the Program for Active Living Coordinator.  She recently moved into her new role and will be supporting the Villages with quality improvement and quality assurance initiatives.  Jaimie is passionate about enhancing the experience of residents and teams and sharing her knowledge through clinical and educational support.

 

 


 

This webinar series is funded by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care through the Centre for Learning, Research, and Innovation in Long-Term Care hosted at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging.

Learn more about the Centres for Learning, Research, and Innovation (CLRI).