Quality Care in Long-Term Care Webinar Series

Free webinar series hosted by the Centre for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA):

  • JANUARY 24:  Enhancing team relationships (view the flyer)
  • FEBRUARY 22:  Maintaining and improving mobility (view the flyer)
  • FEBRUARY 27:  Chronic disease management
  • MARCH 28:  Improving food quality (view the flyer)

These free webinars (see descriptions below) are open to Ontario long-term care (LTC) home providers, residents, family members, volunteers, and students who want to gain new knowledge and strategies to improve the quality of care and life in LTC.

For more information about these webinars, please contact Kate Ducak.


JANUARY 24, 2018  |  3:00PM – 4:00PM EST

Enhancing Team Relationships: A prerequisite to the provision of person-centred care in residential care homes

SiennaCasparSienna Caspar, PhD, MA, Assistant Professor, University of Lethbridge, Faculty of Health Sciences, Therapeutic Recreation program

An unintended consequence of the advent of the computerized medical record is a decrease in care team members coming together to connect and collaborate by actually talking with one another. This evidenced based presentation will focus on the difference between documentation and communication. We will discuss the importance of communication as an essential ingredient to building relationships and trust between care team members. Following this, we learn why enhancing team relationships is an essential prerequisite to the provision of person-centred care. Evidence for this discussion is derived from both quantitative and qualitative studies conducted across multiple LTC settings.

REGISTER TODAY!


FEBRUARY 22, 2018  |  10:00AM – 11:00AM EST

Maintaining and Improving Mobility in Ontario Long-Term Care Homes

CaitlinMcArthurCaitlin McArthur, PhD MScPT, Registered Physical Therapist and Post-Doctoral Fellow, Geriatric Education and Research in Aging Science Centre (GERAS), McMaster University

Maintaining and improving mobility is often a goal for residents and their family members, and is important to prevent functional decline and improve quality of life. This webinar will focus on evidence-based strategies to maintain and improve mobility for residents in LTC homes. The objectives of the webinar are to: 1) discuss current evidence for strategies to maintain and improve resident mobility; 2) present practical solutions for putting evidence about mobility into practice in LTC homes; and 3) examine ways to modify suggestions for different physical and cognitive abilities.

REGISTER TODAY!


FEBRUARY 27, 2018  |  3:00PM – 4:00PM ESTGeorge Heckman

Chronic Disease Management in Long-Term Care Homes

Dr. George Heckman, MD, MMATH, MSc, Schlegel Research Chair in Geriatric Medicine, Associate Professor, Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo;
Staff, Hamilton Health Services Corporation, Hamilton and St. Joseph’s Health Care

Description coming soon!

REGISTER TODAY!


MARCH 28, 2018  |  3:00PM – 4:00PM EST

Improving Food Quality in Long-Term Care HomesHeather Keller

Heather Keller, PhD, RD, FDC, Schlegel Research Chair in Nutrition & Aging; Professor, Kinesiology, University of Waterloo; Research Scientist, Agri-food for Healthy Aging, Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging 

This webinar will review results from the Making the Most of Mealtimes study, and how food plays a role in the nutritional well-being of residents. Focus will be on food provided in LTC, what factors are associated with nutrient density, as well as best practices for promoting nutrient density of menus. Nutrition in Disguise will be discussed as a new initiative to improve nutrient density of commonly consumed foods in LTC.

REGISTER TODAY!


 

Speaker Bios

 

Sienna Caspar, PhD, MA

Assistant Professor, University of Lethbridge, Faculty of Health Sciences, Therapeutic Recreation program

Sienna CasparSienna received a B.Sc. in Therapeutic Recreation from the University of South Alabama in 1990. She has worked in long-term care facilities in both Canada and the United States for over 20 years as both a certified therapeutic recreation specialist (CTRS) and a consultant. She is the author of the MARRCC (Measurable Assessment in Recreation for Resident-Centred Care). From 2003 to 2007 she was a national trainer for the American Therapeutic Recreation Association’s Dementia Practice Guideline for the non-pharmacological treatment of disturbing behaviours. In 2008, she received a MA in Gerontology from Simon Fraser University.  Her thesis explored the relationship between care staff empowerment and the ability to provide person-centred care in long-term care settings.  She continued to study this important topic at the University of British Columbia, where she completed her PhD in the Interdisciplinary Studies Graduate Program. As a postdoctoral fellow in a cross appointment at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute/University Health Network and the University of Victoria, she conducted an intervention study aimed at improving leadership and collaborative decision making in long-term care settings. Currently, she is an assistant professor at the University of Lethbridge in the Faculty of Health Sciences—Therapeutic Recreation program.

 

Caitlin McArthur, PhD MScPT

Registered Physical Therapist and Post-Doctoral Fellow, Geriatric Education and Research in Aging Science Centre (GERAS), McMaster University

CaitlinMcArthur

Caitlin is a registered physical therapist and post doctoral fellow at the Geriatric Education and Research in Aging Science Centre (GERAS) at McMaster University. She recently completed her PhD in the Kinesiology department at the University of Waterloo with a specialization in aging, health, and well-being. Caitlin’s research focuses on improving rehabilitation across the continuum of care, including long-term care and home care. She also has expertise in bone health, exercise, and physical activity. Caitlin is an instructor of Bone Fit™, a continuing education course for rehabilitation professionals working with people with osteoporosis. Caitlin is the recipient of several awards including the Ontario Graduate Scholarship and the Canadian Physiotherapy Association’s Silver Quill Award. Her current work is funded by the McMaster Institute for Research on Aging.

 

Dr. George Heckman, MD, MMATH, MSc

Schlegel Research Chair in Geriatric Medicine, Associate Professor, Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo; Staff, Hamilton Health Services Corporation, Hamilton and St. Joseph’s Health Care

DGeorge Heckmanr. George Heckman graduated in 1991 Doctor of Medicine at University of Toronto, Ontario Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, with specialist certification in Internal Medicine (1999) and Geriatric Medicine Master of Science (Health Research Methodology, McMaster University in 2006). He holds a Schlegel Research Chair in Geriatric Medicine and is presently an Associate Professor with the department of Public Health and Health Systems at the University of Waterloo as well as an Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at McMaster University. Research interests include management of heart failure in long term care and other frail seniors, primary care management of dementia, home care safety and vascular aging.

 

Heather Keller, PhD, RD, FDC

Schlegel Research Chair in Nutrition & Aging; Professor, Kinesiology, University of Waterloo; Research Scientist, Agri-food for Healthy Aging, Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging 

Heather KellerHeather Keller RD PhD is the Schlegel Research Chair in Nutrition & Aging at the University of Waterloo. She conducts research focused on improving the food intake and nutritional health of older adults in hospital, community and long-term care residences. A special focus is persons living with dementia and their care partners and how food and mealtimes can be central to their quality of life.

 


 

This webinar series is funded by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care through the Centre for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care hosted at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging.

Learn more about the Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation (CLRI).